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Vol. XIII, No. 18 



SAW 


II 


•AST 


July 31, 1985 


A Biweekly I'lililicaiion of 4lie Chinese American Civic Association 


Group gets funding 
for studies project 


Choosing A Liaison 


The Asian American Resource 
Workshop will be funded by the 
Massachusetts Council on the ‘ 
Arts and Humanities for its 
project, “Ten Minutes Away: 
The Cultures of Southeast Asia 
and China.” This project is a 
collaboration between the 
AARW, the Chelmsford Public 
School District, and members of 
Southeast Asian communities. 

The goals of the project are to 
develop among students an 
understanding and sensitivity to 
the experience of Southeast 
Asian immigrants and refugees 
through the arts and humani¬ 
ties, develop new approaches to 
studying history through the use 
of arts, and develop among the 
students an effective apprecia¬ 
tion of the s imil arities and 
differences of other cultures to 
their own. 

“The impetus for the project 
came from the Council of the 
Chelmsford Parent-Teacher Or¬ 
ganization,” said AARW Direc¬ 
tor Julian Low. “They (the 
members) should be commend¬ 
ed for recognizing the increased 
presence of Southeast Asians in 
their community and for wanting 
to formalize the study of their 
cultures and histories. 

“The underlying goal is to 
promote understanding, re¬ 
spect, and appreciation within 
the students for diverse cultures 
and people. We’ve been advo¬ 
cating for a long time for the 
inclusion of Asian American 
Studies into the curriculum of 
public schools and universities. 
If you were to judge from U.S. 
history books, Asian American 
history is practically non-exis¬ 
tent.” 

“They (the PTO Council 
members) were concerned that 
our children and their parents 
have little knowledge of the 
fairly large number of families 
from Southeast Asia that have 
moved into the Greater Lowell 
area,” said Chelmsford Public 
School District’s Roger Smyth, 
assistant superintendent for cur¬ 
riculum and instruction. “They 
were concerned that we are 
unaware of the problems many 
of the families have had in 
relocating in this country, let 
alone knowledge of the rich 
cultural background they bring 
with them. It is hoped that our 
program will have considerable 
positive impact on what could be 
a future problem if it is not dealt 
within an intelligent manner.” 

The project will incorporate 
into the sixth grade social 
studies curriculum the history 
and culture of three Southeast 
Asian countries — Vietnam, 
Kampuchea, and Laos. 

“The unique part of the 
program is the involvement of 
the community in the develop¬ 
mental stages,’’Low said. “We, 
along with consultants from the 
Southeast Asian communities, 
will work with the teachers to 
establish the main issues, atti¬ 
tudes, and perspectives of the 
curriculum. It will ensure an 
accurate and honest portrayal of 
Asian history and culture, and 
not as some form of exotica.” 

The curriculum development 
will take place between August 
and December, with the class¬ 
room activities beginning in the 
spring semester. The material 
will be tested on sixth grade 
classes at two Chelmsford el¬ 
ementary schools. 

The project will end with a 
town-wide performance by 
Southeast Asian artists, musi¬ 
cians, dancers, and the students 
themselves. 


Asian officer expected 
to be named by October 



Storm clouds hover over the Chinese Merchants Association 
building in Chinatown before last Friday’s thunderstorms. 
(Photo by Linda Wong) 


Nervous Business 

_ r - • 4 . 

Research on nerve gas 
at Rifts called ‘safe’ 
hut some still nervous 


By Betty Hok-Ming Lam 

Tufts Medical School has 
recently been given a three-year 
grant by the U.S. Dept, of 
Defense (DOD) to study the 
effect of nerve gas on human 
lungs. The research involves a 
chemical agent, soman, a com¬ 
pound used in chemical weap¬ 
ons. 

The research to be conducted 
in one of the laboratories in the 
downtown campus prompted 
safety concerns and moral issues 
both from the surrounding Chi¬ 
natown community and the 
faculty and staffs within the 
medical school. 

Although an independent re¬ 
port from the City of Boston’s 
Dept, of Health and Hospitals 
(DHH) indicated that “there is 
no significant exposure risk to 
the public outside the lab,” 
some community people still 
expressed skepticism toward the 
project being done in such a 
densely populated area. 

The DHH report further stat¬ 
ed that the entire quantity of 
soman to be maintained at Tufts 
at any one time if accidentally 
released is “well below lethal 
levels for inhalation or spillage 
on the skin.” 

According to Dr. Ronald 
Sanders, principal researcher of 
the project at Tufts-, it takes 350 
mg. of soman to be lethal by skin 
application, and 70 mg. to reach 
lethal concentration by inhala¬ 


tion. The DOD is supplying 
Sanders 4 mg. to 10 mg. of the 
chemical agent for testing. How¬ 
ever, it only takes 1 mg. of 
soman to be deadly if injected 
into human body. 

Sanders’ laboratory has to 
undergo major renovations in 
order to bring it up to the safety 
code, according to Dr. Dave 
Damassa, an associate professor 
designated by Tufts’ Dept, of 
Anatomy and Cellular Biology to 
oversee safety issues affecting 
faculty and staffs. 

The exhaust duct and the 
air-conditioning system, said 
Damassa, should be redone to 
keep ventilation completely se¬ 
parated from the rest of the 
building. A charcoal filter and a 
fume hood are required to 
neutralize any gaseous emission 
produced during experiments. It 
was also proposed that walls and 
windows should be sealed up, 
Damassa said. 

And, testing will not begin 
until after safety measures have 
been approved by the DOD, he 
assured. 

Nonetheless, there are ques¬ 
tions: ‘ ‘What happens if all the 
safety mechanisms failed?’ ’ ask¬ 
ed Marilyn Lee-Tom, Boston 
Mayor Raymond L. Flynn’s 
Asian liaison. 

“We need to have a public 
meeting to play out the worst 
circumstances. We need to know 

Continued on page 2 


By L. Kim Tan 

The Boston Police Depart¬ 
ment, pressured by Asian Amer¬ 
ican community leaders and 
activists to deal more effectively 
with anti-Asian violence and 
hostility in the city, will soon 
name a community liaison offi¬ 
cer. 

The liaison, expected to be 
named by October, will most 
likely be chosen from the small 
group of 11 Asian American 
officers now on the force, though 
the BPD indicated that it may 
pick a qualified civilian if none of 
the 11 wanted the job. 

Already there me questions- 
and doubts—about the availabil¬ 
ity of such a person to fill this 
highly difficult, high-profile po¬ 
sition. 

Among a set of standards 
listed in a preliminary BPD draft 
of the position description is one 
that requires the officer to ‘ ‘have 
an excellent knowledge of and 
sensitivity toward the many 
diverse Asian American com¬ 
munities and cultures in the 
city.” The seemingly all-en¬ 
compassing scope of that re¬ 
quirement alone has cast doubts 
among leaders of several 
groups, particularly those 
among the Indochinese commu¬ 
nities. 

“I feel horrible about the job 
description,” says My Nhung 
Mai, project director of the 
Vietnamese American Civic 
Assn. “It’s too vague, too stiff. 
It will be hard to find people to fit 
the requirements.” 

‘ ‘It’ll be hard to find someone 
to fit the description,” echoes 
Savuth Sath, executive director 
of the Cambodian Community of 
Massachusetts. “One (liaison 
officer) is not enough. If there is 
just one, communication will be 
a problem.” 

“They want somebody to 
know all those cultures and 
languages,” says Sandra S. 
Wong, executive director of the 
Massachusetts Assn, of Chinese 
from Indochina. “That’s kind of 
hard to find.” 

The three, along with several 
other Indochinese leaders con¬ 
tacted by The SAMPAN last 
week, also expressed disap¬ 
pointment at the BPD’s failure 
to inform them earlier about a 
July 19 meeting at police head¬ 
quarters, when Bureau of 
Neighborhood Services Chief 
Superintendent Joseph C. Car¬ 
ter handed out the preliminary 
draft and asked of those who 
attended their expectations of 
the liaison’s responsibilities and 
qualifications. 

Both Wong and Sath, and 
Kmhmhu Family Assn. Director 
Margery Cooper, said they did 
not know about the meeting until 
late Thursday (By then, they 
said, they had lined up other 
“important commitments.”). 
Mai said she did not receive 
Carter’s invitation letter until 11 
a.m. on Friday, an hour into the 
meeting. 


With such short notice, an 
upset Mai said: “We’re not 
obliged to meet any of then- 
requests if we don’t want to. 
We’re not their assistants. 
We’re not paid to do their job. 
The meeting’s already oc¬ 
curred.... If they want coopera¬ 
tion they better do a better job. 
We’re ready, but we have our 
work, too.” 

Carter, who had at the meet¬ 
ing said that his office did try to 
contact the absentees by tele¬ 
phone and had ‘ ‘left messages, ’ ’ 
was out of town last week and 
could not be reached for further 
comments. 

Apparently, there had been 
other efforts to contact those 
Indochinese community leaders. 
Chinese Progressive Assn. Co- 
Chair Suzanne Lee said last 
week that both she and Marilyn 
Lee-Tom, Boston Mayor Ray¬ 
mond L. Flynn’s Asian liaison, 
had also telephoned without 
success. 

Thus, only Lee and Lee-Tom, 
along with Chinese Consolidat¬ 
ed Benevolent Assn. President 
David Wong, Chinese American 
Civic Assn. Executive Director 
Chau-ming Lee, and Shirley 
Mark Yuen from the Asian 
American Resource Workshop, 
were at the meeting. 

(Police Commissioner Francis 
M. Roache did not attend as had 
been expected. He was repre¬ 
sented by his executive assist¬ 
ant, Richard Gatto.) 

The fact that they could not 
have attended the meeting is of 
concern to the Indochinese lead¬ 
ers, who now say they don’t 
expect the BPD to not name a 
non-Indochinese to the position 
should it become necessary for 
Comr. Roache to pick a civilian. 

(All 11 of the Asian American 
police officers in the BPD are 
Chinese: Sgt. James Fong, 
Detective James Chin, and Offi¬ 
cers Danny Chau, Gene Chin, 
Stephen Chin, Richard Chin, 

'If they hire someone that can 
speak two or three lan¬ 
guages, it'll be fine.... If they 
don't, they might as well hire 
an American.' 

— Savuth Sath, 
Cambodian Community 
of Massachusetts 


Theodore Lee, Waiman Lee, 
Benjamin Leoung, Homer Moy 
and James Moy. Those contact¬ 
ed by The SAMPAN last week 
say they will not comment on 
whether they would apply for the 
liaison’s job until notice is 
actually posted by the BPD.) 

‘ ‘If they hire someone that can 
speak two or three languages, 
it’ll be fine,” says Savuth Sath. 
“If they don’t, they might as 
well hire an American.” 

The crucial requirement of a 
liaison then, Sath believes, is the 

Continued on page 2 


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Boston, MA 02111 


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2 


The SAMPAN July 31, 1985 


GUEST COMMENTARY 

The 1985 Immigration Reform 
and Control Bill: 

Implications for Asian Americans 

By Henry K. Mui, Executive Director 
Organization of Chinese Americans 
National Office, Washington, D.C. 

The overall theme of this year’s immigra¬ 
tion bill introduced by Senator Alan K. 
Simpson is more regressive compared to 
1984’s compromise version, and is very 
disappointing for all minorities. While it will 
try to address the issue of controlling the 
illegal flow of aliens into the United States, it 
does not deal with the legalization of 
undocumented aliens, many of whom have 
been here for years. 

Under the current proposal, a cutoff date 
of 1980 for granting temporary amnesty to 
undocumented aliens will be inadequate in 
dealing or providing coverage to others 
(arrived after 1980), and thus will not 
accomplish the goal of resolving their status. 

Simpson’s bill would delay amnesty for at 
least a year until a program of stiff fines 
against employers hiring illegal aliens has 
had a chance to become effective, as 
certified by a Presidential Commission. This 
16-member bipartisan commission would be 
nominated by Congress, and appointed for 
life terms by the President. 

To provide assistance to state and local 
governments in carrying out the legalization 


programs, a ceiling of $600 milli on would be 
provided in each of the three fiscal years. It 
does not specify how and what the 
commission would use as indicators for 
evaluating whether employer sanctions and 
the flow of illegal immigrants are “under 
control.” 

The Immigration and Naturalization Ser¬ 
vice would be responsible for enforcing 
employer sanctions, along with the Depart¬ 
ment of Labor. The General Accounting 
Office would monitor the commission’s 
findings and recommendations for legaliza- 
ion, along with the U.S. Commission on Civil 
Rights and the Equal Employment Oppor¬ 
tunity Commission. Given their recent 
records and reputations in enforcing exis¬ 
ting federal laws and statutes, it is doubtful 
that these agencies would do an adequate 
job of monitoring the reform programs 
fairly. 

Businesses with four or more employees 
would be subject to sanctions and would be 
expected to maintain simple records but not 
required to file them. Sanctions against 
employers would range from a warning for 
the first offense to a $10,000 fine per illegal 
alien for an employer who continued to hire 
these aliens. 

The OCA feels that these sanctions would 
increase job discrimination against persons 
of color, whether they be Asian, Hispanic or 
others. Furthermore, they would discourage 
employers from interviewing and hiring 
minorities like Chinese, who can be easily 
identified as “foreigners,” for fear of 
sanctions. They can serve to further 
discourage newcomers to America from 
seeking jobs outside our own community. 


If and when the special panel certifies and 
grants legalization to aliens, it would only 
grant temporary residence for two to three 
years. Permanent residency would be given 
later when the individuals demonstrate 
‘ ‘basic English competency’ ’ and meet other 
existing immigration requirements, This 
kind of measure is particularly discrimina¬ 
tory toward immigrants whose native 
language is other than English, and can be 
easily used to deny legalization. 

In short, the basic assumption is that 
immigrants come to the United States and 
take away jobs from Americans, and that the 
flow must be controlled and regulated. 
America, we must remember, is a nation of 
immigrants. 

The OCA is pleased to learn that 
Simpson’s bill would raise the colonial quota 
from 600 to 3,000, if and when the overall act 
is signed into law. However, we find the 
overall immigration bill discriminatory to¬ 
ward minorities, including Asians, and we 
will continue to’work toward a fair and 
balanced approach to immigration reform. 

With Guest Commentaries, The SAM¬ 
PAN seeks to provide a forum for readers to 
present their views on issues affecting Asian 
Americans. The opinions offered in these 
columns do not necessarily reflect the views 
of this newspaper. 

Commentaries submitted for publication 
should bear the full name and address of the 
author and should not exceed four typewrit¬ 
ten pages, doubled-spaced. Include a 
telephone number where information can be 
verified, and send all commentaries to The 
SAMPAN, 90 Tyler St., Boston, MA 02111. 


Boston Police expected to name 
liaison with help from Asians 


The 

SAMPAN 

Editor-in-Chief: 

Gloria Chun 
Managing Editor: 

Betty Hok-Ming Lam 
Editor, English Edition: 

L. Kim Tcin 

Contributing Writers: 

Peter Bagley, Danny Chin, Doris Chu, 
Tbm Chung, Betty Hok-Ming Lam, 
L. Kim Tkn 

Photographers: 

Linda Wong, Betty Hok-Ming Lam 
lYanslator: 

Betty Hok-Ming Lam 
Design and Layout/ 

English Edition: 

L. Kim T^n 
Design and Layout/ 

Chinese Edition: 

Betty Hok-Ming Lam 
Special Assistance: 

Joann Tkng, Betty Wong, Gloria Shiao 
Circulation Manager: 
Adelaide Cheung 
Distribution Fulfillment: 
Xiao-Ming Chen, Alven Lam 
Typesetting/English Edition: 
Henry Leong, Adelaide Cheung, 
Design Communications, Inc 
lypesetting/Chinese Edition: 

New York Chinese Photo-Type C<x 
Printer: 

Charles River Publishing, Inc 

The SAMPAN is a biweekly, nonprofit, 
nonpartisan newspaper published by 
the Chinese American Civic Associa¬ 
tion, Inc., and supported by a volunteer 
staff. 

All donations are welcome and are tax- 
deductible. They will help support the 
continuation and growth of this 
newspaper. 

Advertising Rates: $5 per column inch, 
$80 per quarter page, $150 per half 
page and $275 per full page There are 
surcharges for Chinese translation and 
typesetting. 


Addition of arrest powers 
to Civil Rights Act urged 
by Asian American lawyers 

The following letter, from the 
Asian American Lawyers Assn, 
of Massachusetts, Inc., is 
addressed to the Hon. Patricia 
McGovern, Chairman of the 
state Senate Committee on 
Ways and Means: 

The Asian American Lawyers 
Association of Massachusetts, 
Inc., strongly supports Senate 
1151, which you have sponsored 
with Attorney General Francis 
X. Bellotti. We urge you to make 
all efforts to move it out of 
Committee onto the floor as soon 
as possible. 

The A ALA, founded in 1983, 
is a professional bar association 
formed to promote the Asian 
legal profession in the context of 
its members’ distinct experi¬ 
ences and common interests as 
Asian American lawyers. The 
Association also seeks to pro¬ 
mote the quality of legal repre¬ 
sentation of Asian Americans 
and to improve the administra¬ 
tion of law and justice. Since its 
inception, the Association has 
established contacts with vari¬ 
ous bar associations and minor¬ 
ity and community groups. 

As you know, Asian Ameri¬ 
cans have, in recent years, been 
subject to numerous incidents of 
racially motivated harassment, 
vandalism and even assault. 
Based on our review of the 
provisions of the Civil Rights 
Act, discussions with a repre¬ 
sentative from the Attorney 
General’s office and the con¬ 
cerns expressed to us by mem¬ 
bers of several community 
groups, we believe that S. 1151 
is crucial to assuring safety to 
Asian Americans and other 
victims in civil rights cases. 

The civil injunctions which 
can be obtained under General 
Laws, chapters 11H and 111, 
perform a central role in pre¬ 
venting further harassment of 
the victims. The provision of 
arrest powers to enforce those 
orders is both logical and neces¬ 
sary, in that it would allow police 
to respond more immediately 
and effectively and to remove a 
defendant who is flouting a 
protective order. 

With the warmer months 
ahead of us, it is critical that this 
legislation be put in place as 
soon as possible. 

PAUL W. LEE, President 

Asian American Lawyers 
Association of 
Massachusetts, Inc. 

Boston, June 27 


Nervous business 
done at 1lifts 

Continued from page 1 


'The word nerve gas scares 
people. They don't under¬ 
stand the small doses we 
have.' 

— Dr. Ronald Sanders, 
Tufts researcher 


if the safety precaution is 
enough and if there is an 
accident, will people know how 
to respond to it?” she said. 

She also pointed out that if 
Tufts is spending a considerable 
sum in renovating a laboratory, 
it is highly possible that the 
institution will seek more nerve 
gas testing contracts from the 
DOD in the future. 

“If they increase the volume 
of the chemical, who will be 
there to monitor them?” Lee- 
Tom said. 

The DHH concluded that it 
will recommend to its board not 
to disapprove the Tufts project. 
However, in order to assure the 
public of its safety, the DHH 
might set up a system to monitor 
the research. 

Carol Lee, executive director 
of the Chinatown Housing and 
Land Development Task Force, 
echoed the same worry. “To say 
that the Department of Defense 
is interested in it as a medical 
research and not as a chemical 
weapon is really quite far 
fetched,” she said. 

Lawrence Cheng, a communi¬ 
ty member, said, “Tufts should 
be more sensitive in dealing with 
issues like this. They should 
come and let us know in 
advance.” 

Sanders contended that the 
project poses no risk to anybody 
outside the lab and therefore 
there is no need to publicize it. 

“The word nerve gas scares 
people. They don’t understand 
the small doses we have,” he 
said. 

The 4 mg. of “diluted” 
soman, in its purest form, 
amounts to less than 1/10 of a 
drop, he explained, and it can be 
neutralized simply by pouring 
household bleach on it. 

However, Sanders admitted 
that, depending on what he will 
learn from the project, he may 
write proposals to do more of 
similar nerve gas testings. 


“I believe this is a legitimate 
medical issue. I am not testing 
the material for warfare use, but 
just getting information to better 
treat potential victims. And 
there is no reason for me to ask 
more material than what I am 
asking now,” he said. 

Larry Boran, a retired safety 
and occupational health special¬ 
ist for the DOD, confirmed that 
the quantity of soman that Tufts 
is getting is only the ‘ ‘threshold 
level” which does not pose any 
danger to the public. He added 
that there are federal laws 
regulating the release of chem¬ 
ical agents to private sectors. 

Stronger criticism from within 
the medical community came 
from Dr. Bruce Batten, who 
argued that even 1/200 of soman 
released through the ventilation 
system into the hallway will 
exceed the limit set by the Public 
Health Service. 

'We do not know the long¬ 
term effect of soman on 
somebody at a reproductive 
age yet. It creates a potential 
threat to our work environ¬ 
ment.' 

— Dr. Bruce Batten, 
researcher's colleague 

“We do not know the long¬ 
term effect of soman on some¬ 
body at a reproductive age yet. It 
creates a potential threat to our 
work environment,” said Bat¬ 
ten, who works on the same floor 
as Sanders, at 136 Harrison Ave. 

Even if all the safety require¬ 
ments are met, Batten said, he 
still opposes it on moral 
grounds. 

“Our job (as doctors) is to 
alleviate suffering. We teach our 
students to be compassionate. I 
myself cannot justify doing 
research that will inflict suffer¬ 
ing or perpetuate the idea of 
carrying on a war,” he said. 

Dr. Joseph Burns, associate 
dean of the medical school, said 
he feels that there are scientific 
merits to the research. The goal 
of the test is to find out what the 
damage is to the lungs in 
sub-lethal exposure, and to help 
better treat such toxicity. The 
information obtained will also be 
applicable to crop pesticide 
exposure, according to Bums. 


Call us to find out how you 
can get on our first-class 
mailing list. Our telephone 
numbers are (617) 426-8673 
and 426-9492. 


Continued from page 1 

ability to communicate with all 
community members—especial¬ 
ly with those victims of crime 
who speak little or no English. 

“The liaison’s really an advo¬ 
cate,” says Sandra Wong. “He 
or she must definitely be bilin¬ 
gual, visible in the community, 
know some important people 
and happenings in the communi¬ 
ty, and know where to get help. ’ ’ 

“There should be two liai¬ 
sons,” says My Nhung Mai, 
who, while lamenting that the 
Vietnamese community “cannot 
be involved because it doesn't 
understand the system,” wants 
a liaison who’ll be able to work 
well with members of her 
community. 

“We see a lot of Chinese 
around already,” Mai says. 
‘ ‘They’ve been here a long time, 
made themselves marketable 
from learning the system.... The 
government should let them 
(Vietnamese) have the oppor¬ 
tunity, let them have time to 
learn. Send them to training- 
not ask for experienced people. ’' 

To all that, Gatto says that, 
while the Commissioner had 
always considered the diversity 
of the larger Asian American 
community, the BPD will name 
only one liaison. “Whoever 
selected,” Gatto says, “will be 
from one facet of the community 
who can put together resources 
that represent the rest.” 

And, Gatto says, “The first 
priority is to recruit from the 
officers on the force.” 

Meanwhile, those who attend¬ 
ed the July 19 meeting have 
indicated in the majority that 
they’d like the liaison office to be 
filled by someone already on the 
force. A civilian, they said, will 
probably find it difficult to work 
in the company of a seemingly 
closed society of law enforcers. 

Nonetheless, said Suzanne 
Lee, “It’s unfair to put that kind 
of burden on the 11 (Asian 
American officers). And we’re 
definitely not for a non-Asian 
from the force.” 

Supt. Carter, who said the 
BPD will include in the inter¬ 
viewing process members from 
the Asian American co mmunit y, 
has called for another meeting. 
It will be held on Aug. 2, and, in 
the meantime, community lead- 
ders are expected to have filed 
with him their comments on the 


preliminary draft by July 30. 
Carter will then provide an 
amended draft at the meeting. 

At the first meeting, there was 
some debate on the two possible 
base sites for the liaison officer. 
The liaison, who will report 
directly to Carter, may either 
work out of police headquarters 
or out of a satellite station in the 
community. 

Though some cited the advan¬ 
tage of ‘ ‘visibility in the commu¬ 
nity” (if the liaison worked out of 
the satellite station), it is expect¬ 
ed that the officer will work out 
of headquarters, at 154 Berkeley 
St. Many in the group suggested 
that it was far more important 
for the liaison to establish a 
much needed “network” in the 
Boston Police Department—a 
network that could only help in 
the combatting of crimes against 
Asian Americans, who, many 
community leaders have said, 
suffer from inadequate protec¬ 
tion by law enforcement officers. 

The debate will probably be 
settled at the Aug. 2 meeting— 
to which, many of those July 19 
absentees say, they will go. 


Firefighters’ exam to be held 

The Mass. Dept, of Personnel 
Administration will be holding a 
civil service exam for firefight¬ 
ers Sat., Sept. 14. All applica¬ 
tions must be submitted by Fri., 
August 16. 

Applicants must be over 19 
and under 32 years of age on the 
last filing date. There is a $10 
application fee, which will not be 
refunded. 

For a copy of the announce¬ 
ment poster, applications or 
other information, write the 
Dept, of Personnel Administra¬ 
tion, One Ashburton Place, 
Room 201, Boston, MA 02108. 
Or call 727-8370, or 800-392- 
6178. 


The next issue of The SAM¬ 
PAN will be published Wed., 
Aug. 14. 

Press releases and advertise¬ 
ments which require transla¬ 
tion, typesetting or artwork 
are accepted up to Tues., 
Aug. 6 at 5 p.m. 
Camera-ready advertise¬ 
ments are accepted up to Fri., 
Aug. 9 at 5 p.m. 

Copies of The SAMPAN’s 
publication and advertising 
schedules can be obtained by 
calling 426-8673 or 425-9492. 






























The SAMPAN July 31, 1985 


3 


Newsmakers 


THIS ISSUE’S ENTRIES: 

The Boston Globe celebrated 
the installation of its new press 
units by sponsoring an essay 
contest on the freedom of the 
press for Boston public schools. 
The winning entry was submit¬ 
ted by Eva Ho of East Boston, 
who has just completed seventh 
grade at the Boston Latin 
School. 

Ho’s essay appeared in the 
Op-ed page of the July 12 
Sunday Globe. Two of the four 
runners-up—one of them by 
Diemlan Nguyen of the Brighton 
High School—also appeared in 
the Globe, on page 42. 

We are happy for these young 
Americans, who in their essays 
show a fundamental under¬ 
standing of the First Amend¬ 
ment to the U.S. Constitution. 
We also hope that their unclut¬ 
tered enthusiasm for the free¬ 
dom of the press will lead them 
in the future into meaningful 
careers in journalism. 

Mimi Chiu Ng of Brighton was 
one of 46 recent recipients of 
Bank of New England Teacher 
Fellowships. The program is 
aimed at rewarding and enrich¬ 
ing outstanding Boston Public 
School teachers through con¬ 
tinuing education programs. 

Congratulations also go to 
Linell Yugawa, recently selected 
as Director of the Asian Student 
Center at Tufts University. 

R€fll €STflT€ 


Charlestown’s Helen Chin 
Schlichte has accepted a leader¬ 
ship role in the 1985 United Way 
of Massachusetts Bay fundrais¬ 
ing campaign. Schlichte, assist¬ 
ant to the Secretary for the 
Commonwealth of Massachu¬ 
setts’ Executive Office for Ad¬ 
ministration and Finance, has 
been a top-level United Way 
volunteer for the past several 
years. 

This year, she will serve for 
the fourth consecutive term on 
the organization’s campaign 
cabinet as associate chairperson 
of the Commonwealth of Mas¬ 
sachusetts Employees Cam¬ 
paign (COMEC) Division. Her 
responsibilities include assist¬ 
ing the COMEC chairperson in 
leading the fundraising efforts 
directed at state employees. 

Also a vice president of the 
United Way board of directors, 
Schlichte was elected to the 
board in 1979 and to vice 
president in 1981. 

Finally—we’d like to catch up 
with Delaware’s Lieutenant 
Governor S.B. Woo, the highest 
ranking Chinese in American 
politics to date who was the 
subject of a SAMPAN inter¬ 
view in February: 

According to a readers ’ poll by 
Delaware Today, the state’s only 
local magazine, the Lt. Gover¬ 
nor’s job was rated as the second 
best in Delaware. Commenting 
on the results, Woo, in his 
customary self-deprecating 
style, said: “That’s rather sur¬ 


prising, since, in the past, the 
Lt. Governor’s job has often 
been described as ‘not worth the 
spit you shine your shoe with’. ’ ’ 

In a separate poll of Delaware 
politicians, Woo was rated as the 
“Best Rising Young Star” in 
state politics. Surprised by the 
rating and the statement that 
‘‘He may ultimately do better in 
the U.S. House or Senate, as 
Dover folks may place too many 
obstacles before him,” Woo 
said: “I have not even made up 
my mind to run for any position 
next electipn. My decision will 
have to depend on my satisfac¬ 
tion with my performance this 
time around.” 

Go for it, S.B.! 


Secretary 

Required Cantonese/fluency in Eng¬ 
lish. Experienced in office manage¬ 
ment, typing and general telephone 
communication. Starting salary: 
$11,600. Starting date: 9/3/85. Call 
482-9464. 


WOMEN’S CENTER 
COORDINATOR 

Strong feminist. Women of color, 
older women, and/or poor and work¬ 
ing class women encouraged to apply. 
30nrs/week, *7/hr and benefits. 
Letters of interest to: Hiring Commit¬ 
tee, Women’s Center, 46 Pleasant St., 
Cambridge, MA 02139 by Aug. 2. Info 
354-8607. 


Help Wanted 

Full time/PT time. Customer 
service/stock work. In busy 
So. End hardware store. 
Interviews, Tue-Fri. Warren 
Elec. & HDWRE. 426-7525. 


Child car el Household care 

Live-in. Back Bay. Care new 
born. Experienced. Must be 
23 y.o. plus. Legal resident. 
Lt. house work. Start Sept., 
1985. With references. 267- 
5652. 


JOB DEVELOPER 

Refugee Resettlement 
Program looking for per¬ 
son with strong communi¬ 
cation skills to do job 
development, counseling 
and placement. F.T., 
13,000 base, negotiable 
dep. on exp. 


Now Renting 

Olde Derby Village Apartments 

A beautifully landscaped apartment community in 
Norwood has 13 one-bedroom, 19 two-bedroom and 3 
three-bedroom apartments available for rent by eligible 
Section 8 and Chapter 707 certificate holders. Handicapp¬ 
ed units are available. OLDE DERBY VILLAGE is located 
on the corner of Wilson/Walpole Streets in Norwood. 
Interested certificate holders should contact the issuing 
Agency to determine their eligibility for this development. 
All eligible certificate holders should contact Peg at 
Community Planning and Development Associates at 
848-2500. Applications can be made in person at 10 Forbes 
Road in Braintree Monday through Friday - 9:30 to 4:30. 
Financed by Massachusetts Housing and Finance Agency 
Developed, built and managed by The Simon Companies. 



Locksmithing 

We train you to 
service and in¬ 
stall residential 
and commercial locks and 
security devices. You’ll also 
learn fundamentals of master 
keying and manipulation of safe 
combination units. Course 
length is 10 months. 

Full-time day classes Monday-Friday. 
September through June. 

Register now for September Class. 

Financial aid available. 

For catalog, write or call 227-0155. 

NORTH-BENNET 
STREET SCHOOL 

39 North Bennet Street • Boston, MA 02113 


Watch Repair 


We offer a comprehensive course 
in the repair of all mechanical and 
electro-mechanical watches. Course 
length is 11 months. 

Jewelry Making 
& Repair 

This benchwork course 
emphasizes fabrication, repair 
and stone setting techniques. 
Course length is 17 months. 

Full-time day classes Monday-Friday. 
Register now for September class. • 
Financial aid available. 

For catalog, write or call 227-0155. 

NORTH-BENNET 
STREET SCHOOL 

39 North Bennet Street • Boc ton, MA 02113 



equal housing 

OPPORTUNITY 


Studios 


ESL INSTRUCTOR 

V 2 -time position in Refu- 
fee Office Skills Training 
Program. 


BEACON HILL studios in well staffed, 
newly renovated historic building near 
State House. Has elevators, laundry, 
lunch room and sun decks. Near shops 
and T. Ideal for mature adults. From 
$408 heated. 532-8295. 


Send resume to Cindy 
Gimbert, RRP Search 
Committee, CACA, 90 
Tyler St., Boston, MA 
02111. 


DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY EDUCATION 
AND OUTREACH 


Oxfam America, a non-profit, international development 
organization, seeks a Director of Community Education 
and Outreach to provide overall guidance for domestic 
educational program including campaigns, fundraising 
and constituency outreach. Responsible for 14 person 
department. Requires strong administrative skills. Please 
send resume to Candace Hall, Oxfam America, 115 
Broadway, Boston, MA 02116. Deadline for applications: 
August 9,1985. No phone calls, please. Oxfam America is 
an equal opportunity employer. We encourage women and 
people of color to apply. 


SOCIAL WORK ASSOCIATE 

BA/BSW to work in Adult Med/Surg. Primarily responsible for 
delivering services to Asian in- and outpatients. Bilingual 
Chinese/English required. Toisinese preferred. 1-2 years’ experience 
preferred. 

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER 

Full-time position in adult med-surg unit. Provision of clinic ser¬ 
vices to patients and families. Consultation to multidisciplinary 
staff. MSW and license eligibility required. 

For the preceding positions, please send resumes to Kathryn 
Stewart 

Salaries are excellent Benefits include 3 weeks’ paid vaca¬ 
tion,, medical coverage, life insurance, tuition assistance, night 
transportation and more. 


4 


New England 
Medical Center 

171 Harrison Avenue, Box 795 
Boston. MA 02111 

An equal opportunity employer, M/F. 


Help Wanted 



SECRETARY/FIGURE CLERK 

Part-time 25 hours per week Monday through Friday. 
Responsibilities include light bookkeeping, bill process¬ 
ing, record keeping, light typing, answering phones. Good 
organizational skills and relating skills are important. 

Please send resume to: 

P.O.Box 2006 
Jamaica Plain, MA02130 


TOWN OF BROOKLINE 
FIREFIGHTER EXAM 

The State Department of Personnel Administration (DPA) 
will be conducting a Civil Service qualifying examination 
for Fire fighters on Saturday, September 19, 1985. 
Applications must be received by the DPA no later than 
August 16,1985. Applications are available at the DPA or 
at Brookline Town Hall (Personnel Office). Applicants are 
encouraged to indicate on the preference sheet (given at 
the time of the exam) a desire to be certified for the Town 
of Brookline. Please note: you must be under 32 years old 
but have reached your 19th birthday in order to be eligible 
for this exam. 

An Affirmative Action/Opportunity Employer 




JOB DEVELOPER 

Full-time, serving Southeast Asian community, contact 
employers, obtain job listings, effectively communicate 
with Vietnamese and Cambodian case managers, arrange 
interviews, case recordings, follow up on placements. 
Bilingual and car a plus. Salary: $18,500. 

CASE MANAGER 

Full-time, multi-lingual Vietnamese/Cambodian/English 
to register and assess people for job placement and ESL 
programs; good spoken and written English; ab ility to get 
along with Southeast Asians and Americans; must have a 
car. Salary: $13,500. 

Please send resume to: 

P.O.Box 2006 
Jamaica Plain, MA02130 


INVESTIGATOR 


Under the Exec. Dir., will conduct and supervise investigations, 
reporting results; research and analyze relevant legal issues; 
perform compliance reviews; and provide counseling info. 
Required: BA/BS; 3-4 yrs. civil rights law enforcement/investi¬ 
gation or JO with 1 -2 yrs. public interest practice; proven abil. to 
investigate/analyze complex civil rights issues, conduct inter¬ 
views, counsel complaintants and prepare accurate, sound 
reports; Boston residency. Bilingual pref. 

ADMIN. ASST./ 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

To work with the.Exec. Dir., coord, staff assignments, managing 
the budget, transcribing and preparing various materials and 
coord, comm, outreach activity. Required: 2-3 yrs. office 
administrative experience or BA/BS or equivalent and 1 -2 yrs.; 
understanding of office procedures and budgeting; effective 
typing, writing and supervisory skills; abil. to use or learn word 
processing; Boston residency. Bilingual and comm, affairs exp. 
pref. 

SECRETARY/ADMIN. ASST. 

A wide range of clerical, secretarial and admin, duties. Required: 
3-4 yrs. exp.; accurate 60 wpm typing; knowl. of office pro¬ 
cedures; exc. communication skills; Boston residency. Bilingual, 
word processing exp., legal sec. background are pref. 

To apply, submit resume or letter stating your qualifications to: 
HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION, 957 City Hall, Boston, MA 
02201, Attn: Frederick Mendel. 



* « *■ K 


SOUTH COVE MANOR NURSING HOME 


120 Shawmut Avenue 
Boston, MA 02118 


OPENING SOON - BE THERE DAY ONE 


Many new job opportunities for people who seek a 
rewarding career providing for the health care needs of the 
community’s frail elderly. On-the-job training available 
for most jobs. Our benefit package includes health 
insurance, paid vacation, sick and personal time. All 
shifts, full-time and part-time available. 


NURSES: RN’s, LPN’s 
NURSE’S AIDES 
HOUSEKEEPERS 
LAUNDRY WORKERS 
MAINTENANCE WORKERS 


SECRETARIES 
ACTIVITY ASSISTANTS 
COOKS 
DIET AIDES 
SECURITY PERSONNEL 


Applications and further information about these jobs are 
available NOW at CACA, 90 Tyler Street, Boston. We will 
be interviewing on August 6 and 7 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
and on August 8 from 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at CACA. 









































































4 


The SAMPAN 


July 31, 1985 


Fundraiser held for 
Harry H. Dow Fund 

The Asian American Lawyers 
Association of Massachusetts 
recently held its first fundraiser 
for its Harry H. Dow Memorial 
Legal Assistance Fund, a per¬ 
manent endowment to train 
lawyers, conduct legal educa¬ 
tion, and provide legal resources 
and assistance to the Asian 
community. 

The fundraiser was held July 9 
in conjunction with the visit to 
Boston of Gordon Hirabayashi, a 
plaintiff in one of the cases filed 
to overturn convictions for defy¬ 
ing Executive Order 9066, which 


had authorized the relocation 
and incarceration of over 
100,000 Japanese Americans 
during World War II. 

Three events were held, be¬ 
ginning with an informal lunch¬ 
eon at the Massachusetts Bar 
Association at 20 West St. in 
Boston. There was also a screen¬ 
ing of the film about the 
Japanese Americans’ intern¬ 
ment cases, “Unfinished Busi¬ 
ness,” at the Northeastern Uni¬ 
versity School of Law. 

The evening event featured 
the film as well as a discussion 
by Hirabayashi on the status of 
these cases and a reception at 
the University of Massachu- 


Greetings 
from the 



666 Washington St, Boston 
on the edge of Chinatown 


setts/Boston Downtown Center. 

Individuals who helped spon¬ 
sor the events with donations 
($25 or more) included Caroline 
Chang, Yu Chi Ho, Daniel Lam, 
Diana Tanaka, Khin-lin John¬ 
son, May Takayanagi, Sharon 
Soong and Hemmie Chang. 

The Fund—a tribute to Harry 
H. Dow, the first Asian Ameri¬ 
can admitted to the Massachu¬ 
setts Bar who donated legal 
services to Chinatown and South 
End organizations and who 
advocated for Boston’s poor- 
also has the support of other 
organizations, including the 
Asian American Resource 
Workshop, American Friends 
Service Committee, Japanese 
American Citizens League, 
Massachusetts Asian American 
Forum, and Northeastern Uni¬ 
versity School of Law. 

Five trustees have been de¬ 
signated to oversee the disposi¬ 
tion of the Fund for the appropri¬ 
ate purposes and to direct the 
money to where it is most 
needed. The current trustees are 
Caroline J. Chang, Vivian Wen- 
huey Huang, Khin-lin Johnson, 
Sharon Soong and Harry Yee. 


Quaker group 
slams silence 
on Hub racism 

Boston area residents must 
become “more visible and 
vocal” in confronting racial 
violence and the “pattern of 
ignorance and misunderstand¬ 
ing that leads to such acts,” the 
acting executive secretary of the 
New England regional office of 
the American Friends Service 
Committee said in a July 23 
press release. 

“We applaud the powerful 
words of Rev. Charles Stith of 
the Union United Methodist 
Church who said recently that 
‘All citizens of Boston must 
stand up and declare unequivo¬ 
cally that racial violence will not 


be tolerated.’ We must make it 
clear in our daily lives that 
attitudes of bigotry and acts of 
aggression against others whose 
skins are of a different color are 
un-American and anti-human,” 
said Devon Davidson. “We 
must create a climate where 
bigotry cannot continue.” 

“Our city is shadowed by a 
cloud of racism, directed most 
virulently against refugees from 
Southeast Asia whose lives 
already have been particularly 
difficult in recent years,” said 
Davidson. 

“They are not here because 
they have come to seek the 
economic opportunities of the 
U.S. They are victims, displaced 
by war and harsh conditions in 
their homelands caused in part 
by the U.S. role in Vietnam, Laos 
and Cambodian (Kampuchea),” 
asserted Davidson. “They are 
seeking peace and new lives 
here, just as many of our 
grandparents and great-grand¬ 
parents did in the past.” 

Khin-lin Johnson, of the 
AFSC’s Community Empower¬ 
ment Program, said, “Many of 
us believe the attacks are being 
fostered by anger evoked by the 
loss of the war in Vietnam and 
the recent popularity of films 
such as ‘Rambo: First Blood’ 
which glorify violence against 
Asians.” 

Noting that the attacks have 
stimulated a growing unity in 
Boston’s Asian community and a 
more active stance on the part of 
the Boston Civil Rights Coali¬ 
tion, Johnson said: “It is time to 
take the heroics out of hooligan¬ 
ism and to expose the Ram bos as 
products of racist fantasies. The 
real heroes are those who speak 
out against such acts of violence, 
preventing their neighborhoods 
and communities from being 
tarnished by the acts of a 
misguided few. It is time for 
people to stand up and say ‘no’ 
to the crime of silence which 
permits expressions of racism.” 


CALENDAR EVENTS 


SOH DAIKO, Aug. 3. Free performance 
by New York-based Japanese drum 
ensemble, which had performed at the 
1983 Dragon Boat Festival. 8 p.m. at 
Copley Square Plaza. Rain date: Aug. 4 at 
2 p.m. Sponsored by Asian American 
Resource Workshop and First Night, Inc. 

BOSTON POLICE HEARING, Resumes 
Aug. 5. Open internal police hearing of 
Det. Frank Kelly, who is charged with 
misconduct, falsifying police report and 
using excessive force in the arrest of 
immigrant Long Quang Huang. Hearing 
continues at 10 a.m. on the 4th Floor of 
police headquarters, 164 Berkeley St., 
Boston. 

SCCHC OUTREACH PROGRAM SUM¬ 
MER OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES, Aug. 17, 
Sept. 7 & 21.Recreational tours sponsor¬ 
ed by South Cove Community Health 
Center: Aug. 17, Rocky Point Park (R.I.); 
Sept. 7, New York City; Sept. 21, 
Stoneham Zoo & Shopping Center. 
Register first. Call Esther Ang at 
482-7656 fortunes and other information. 

QSCC SPECIAL ACTIVITIES, Until Aug. 
30. Quincy School Community Council 
activities: Aug. 4, Canoe Trip; Aug. 6, 
Gym Olympics; Aug. 13, Pool Olympics; 
Aug. 17 & 18, Youth Camping Trip; Aug. 
23, Pool Carnival; Aug. 26 Hiking Trip; 
Aug. 30, Hopkinton State Park Collabora¬ 
tive Trip. Call 426-6660 for more 
information. 

MUSEUM OF SCIENCE SPECIAL SUM¬ 
MER WEEKENDS WITH A TOUCH OF 
CHINA, Through August. Potpourri of 
special activities at the museum during 
the afternoons of the days scheduled. 
Most last 20 to 30 minutes, some with 
repeat performances on the same day. 
Aug. 4: “Memories of a Chinese 
Grandmother'’-puppeteers from You 
and Me Puppets present a live dramatiza¬ 
tion of the meeting of two cultures, as an 
American child gains an appreciation of 
Chinese people and their customs. Aug. 
10: Demonstration by accomplished 
potter, Syma, of the fascinating process 
that transforms clay into exquisite 
Chinese porcelain. Aug. 11: “The Pro¬ 
cess and Art of Ceramics’’—talk given by 
well-known lecturer, Bill Sargent, from 
the Peabody Museum, Salem. Aug. 17: 
Viewers of all ages can learn how to make 
paper in their own homes as Pat Senecal 
demonstrates an ancient technique. Aug. 
17 A 18: Dr. Kenneth Chang will teach 
the Chinese art of paper-folding. Aug. 24 
& 26: Chinese cooking demonstrated by 
Chinese Gourmet Restaurant’s chef, 
James Shou, on Saturday; and by Juliet 
Chang on Sunday. Call 723-2601 ext. 308 
for times and other information, or check 
with the Membership desk at the 
museum. 


Bay State Gold Show 


AUGUST 9-10-11 

Largest gold and jewelry show in America! 

JL 0 > -f“ El ' -f~ — 0 

"57" Park Plaza Hotel « _ _ „ 

Howard Johnson (near Chinatown) D / a 

200 Stuart Street Howard Johnson ( ) 

Park Square, Boston t » 


Features: Over 130 displays 

. Over $10 million of gold coins for sale 
Over $ 5 milloin of gold jewelry for sale 
Also rare coins, bullion, foreign coins 
and Chinese coins. 

Admission: $1.50 
Children: $1.00 

Friday and Saturday, 10:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. 
Sunday, 10:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. 


-f M TLK'k ^ A ^ 
Ml ifc $ 

MEJ + 


Show special: 14-karat gold earrings 

with genuine one-point diamonds 
$9 a pair ($25 value) 

Show Manager: Edward J. Aleo 


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32 Kneeland Street 
Boston, MA 02111 
Tel: 423-4487 


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FAR EAST PRINTING CO. 

33 HARRISON AVENUE 
CHINATOWN, BOSTON 
PHONE 426-2377 


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Quincy Commons—328-6727 

1 Canton R<±, Quincy 

Brockton Commons—584-2373 

55 City Hall Plaza, Brockton 

Tribune Apartments—875-8861 

46 Irving St.. Framingham 

The Chester Apartments—696-9010 

525 Massachusetts Ave.. Boston 

Stratton Hill Park—852-0060 

161 W. Mountain St.. Worcester 

Faxon Commons—472-6766 

1001 Southern Artery. Quincy 

Stone Run • east—331-2525 

8 Old Stone Way. Weymouth 

Hanover Legion Elderly Apartments—871-3049 

Spring St.. Hanover 

Channing Terrace Apartments—757-9239 

26 Channing St.. Worcester 

Academy Building Apartments—674-1111 

102 South Main St.. Fall River 

Lincoln School Apartments—749-8677 

86 Central St.. Hingham 

Weymouth Commons/east—335-4773 

66 Rock way Ave.. Weymouth 

Andover Commons—470-2611 

30 Railroad St.. 

Andover 



Saugus Commons—233-8477 

21 Newhall Ave.. Saugus 

McNamara House—783-5490 

69 Holton St.. Allston 

Kent Village—545-2233 

152 Kent St., Scituate 




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Imperial Teahouse 

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